Ask.com search results redesign

The new ask.com

I thought I’d spend a few paragraphs on the ask.com redesign (linked above). While the search result is just about the same as the previous ask.com, with the Narrower, Broader, and Related terms being returned along with the set, the interface is significantly different.

First off, they’ve created a column on the left entirely related to your search. In there, they’ve dropped the semantic terms, the link to advanced search, and the search box. This is a great idea, since search results take up more vertical space than horizontal, so there’s still plenty of room for results in the bride of the page.

Secondly, they’ve added immediate returns on the Image, Encyclopedia, and Video results in the far right column. Something new for ask.com. This gives the page a look more of an atlas than a set of search results. Third, they’ve organized the center column so that a Best Bets result appears above the sponsored results and the result set proper.

Within the results, they bold your search term and provide a sneak peek of what the result’s web page looks like. Though I’m not entirely convinced a set of binoculars makes any sense, the functionality is welcome.

More drastically, however, is that they’ve done the entire thing using a fairly robust pageless concept. The advanced search widget appears as a layer above a ghosted background, the my stuff and options menus behave as if they were OS menu systems, and each result can be moused over and added to the “Your Stuff” section of ask.com using a little “+” icon.

There’s no evidence I can find that they’ve improved their results, however. That said, ask.com has always been — in my mind — a search engine for librarian-types: research-oriented rather than democracy-driven. A different take, but not one that is necessarily awful.

The result? Well, all of the elements of a solid result set are there: semantic (broader, narrower, related, variant) suggestions, spell-checking, best bets, and exploratory items that a user may not have thought of using (images and video). It’s a well-rounded search engine that deserves more attention than it gets.

On the flip side, while ask.com does the right thing in providing the semantically-related terms, their meta data can sometimes be off. Follow the link above, and see if you can spot the “Related Names” that aren’t necessarily something you’d expect.

Directions in Youth Soccer

I noticed while helping out at the U14 and U12 tryouts this past Sunday that there is a significant drop-off rate from U12 to U14. Specifically, it’s about fifty percent or so. After digging around a bit, I found out that the drop off rate is even worse from U14 to U16 and U18. In Beverly, we weren’t able to field a U16 team in one instance due to a shortage of players. The reasons are probably varying, but one that I heard really stood out to me.

Club teams in the area tend to take precedence over the town teams. The way our local leagues are structured, kids who choose to play in the club teams aren’t allowed to participate in the county system. You can’t blame them, really, as the club teams are more competitive and offer a greater chance for being noticed to the right players. That said, it can cost upwards of $2,000 to play in some of the club teams around here.

So, while the players get the chance to compete at the highest level and improve their game, the towns are unable to offer a high level of competition to other towns in the area. Also, kids who can’t afford the club team are left without the chance to play outside of school.

For here, I think we can solve this by engendering in the younger players a sense of pride in playing for the town. I suppose that, really, the sense of pride needs to be instilled in the parents, though. Whichever it is, if we can keep most of the players interested in the town teams, we won’t lose the competitive edge. With that edge, we will probably be able to hang on to more players. The cycle benefits everyone, in my mind.

Soccer on the basketball court

I just looked outside to see how my son’s doing on the playground and was greeted with the greatest sight a soccer freak like myself could see: he and a group of kids in windbreakers playing ad-hoc soccer on the basketball court. He had just scored and was running around the court, his arms out to his sides, cheering in glee. It’s underground. It’s magic. It’s what this country needs more of if we’re going to further develop our soccer standing around the world.

Kids playing soccer is almost natural. A simple and inexpensive game, everyone can play it with minimal effort. Started young enough, the magic of the feet and ball becomes second nature in the older players. Skill development is augmented by memories of playground and gym games with friends and foes and the skills come quicker without replacing the joy. It’s this kind of environment that fosters true soccer skills in the same way stick ball can turn into the most elegant form of baseball we’ll ever play.

Encourage your kids to play more often — the type of ball and shoes don’t matter on the playground — and you’ll find an energy to the game that maybe your local clubs or soccer organizations can’t generate on their own. Heck, go out and join them if you’re willing to leave the rules at home. All that matters is that feet are dancing happily around that elusive sphere in the grass, on the pavement, on the dirt.

Soccer is addictive and if allowed to come from the roots in which it was refined will become pervasive. It’s only a matter of time.

Men’s Open Cup 2007

Region 1 Amateur Qualifying

The US Open Cup qualifying matches are in full swing, and unfortunately there’s not much hope for our uber-local teams in the Amateur or Premier Development Ranks.

Not far from here, though, Danbury United from Connecticut are in a position to challenge the Aegean Hawks from D.C. from the Region 1 Amateur ranks. Sadly, local teams Phantoms and Lowell Revolution were ousted early on.

PDL Eastern Conference Qualifying

Up in the Premiere Development League (PDL), Vermont Voltage (30 miles from my hometown) are long gone. Cape Cod needs to win their next match (vs. Vermont) if they’re to have any hopes of beating out Long Island Rough Riders, but that will also depend on Long Island losing or drawing. Who are they playing? Vermont, so my money’s on Long Island to secure the PDL spot for the Northeast.

Ahh, wouldn’t it be awesome?

American Soccer Pyramid – Wikipedia

This is something I would like to see happen in this country: an interconnection of all of the various divisions of soccer. How cool would it be to see the Vermont Voltage struggle their way, season by season, to the MLS? Isn’t it about time that Rochester, NY got themselves an MLS team? Well, with a system of promotion and relegation, it could happen.

I’ve heard from a few people that there are some difficult financial issues to work out with the promotion/relegation systems, but I think the results are worth it: wider-spread soccer, more teams created at the local level (because the dream is there to go higher), and the passion that only a team facing relegation can muster.

I know that it will probably never happen, but I’d still like to think it’s possible.