On the Preamble of the United States Constitution

To encapsulate one’s political views by attachment to a single party or platform is — in essence — to also limit one’s ability to address issues as they truly are. This is a truth, and one that is difficult for some people to understand. The Republican, Democratic, Libertarian, Green, or any other party is unable to address any issue we face in this country head-on because each member of that party is beholden to a prescribed set of ideals that all lead to the same solutions. One thing I’ve found in my life is that there is no one set of solutions that fix all problems.

To that end, I remain — with a Libertarian bent — an Independent. Proud to owe or show no affiliation to any particular platform, and free to approach each problem our country faces in as objective a manner as possible.

In order to remain objective, one must always have a foundation upon which to build an observation point. For my foundation, I’ve chosen the United States Constitution. Over the next few weeks, I will be examining it in this space.

There is far too much evidence out there that people don’t really understand what the document is, what it really means, and how it can be used to set us all free from the impending tyranny of fear that is rising up in this nation.

I begin with the Preamble:

“We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

For such a short paragraph, there’s a lot being said. What is the purpose of government? What are the ideals of the country for which the government exists? Why does this country exist at all?

The purpose of the Constitution is to establish a foundation for a country that would “form a more perfect Union” than anyone had ever seen before. Specifically, however, there are five items addressed; five reasons the founders believed a government should exist:

  • Establish justice
  • Insure domestic tranquility
  • Provide for national (common) defense
  • Promote the welfare of the population
  • Secure the idea of liberty for all generations

In the eyes of the founders, then, government should do all of the above: nothing more, nothing less. If at any point anyone of us feels that even one of the above is missing from our lives, the government is not doing what the founders intended. This is the philosophy behind the entire document.

The key, however, to the preamble appears when you read it without the five purposes of government and the reason for the document. “We the People of the United States do ordain and establish this Constitution…”. Who establishes the Constitution? The citizens of the country for which the government is established. It’s a powerful realization.

The document is not presented by a government, then, but by the combined effort of a people from a shared region who are agreeing to unite in their common causes; who are working together to solve their problems: to establish justice, peace, defense, welfare and liberty for themselves and the future. This is the foundation upon which our country is built.

We are a United States. United for the betterment of all citizens under the Constitution. United in order to better provide for each other. United in order to better defend one another. United in order to form a more perfect union. It wasn’t intended by our founders, but we are at the point where each of us must be asking ourselves whether or not we are still working towards the five simple reasons for government. That’s how we know if we’re moving in the right direction.

So, rather than attach ourselves to a platform or party of supposed ideology, we should attach ourselves to the ultimate platform and actual ideology upon which all others are based: our Constitution. Each party, after all, is simply an attempt at approaching the creation of government in a different way. Choose however you wish, but never forget the five reasons you are choosing: justice, domestic1 peace, common defense, welfare of the citizens, and liberty.

1. Word added as a clarification. See comments thread for details.

2 Replies to “On the Preamble of the United States Constitution”

  1. Two things — to be uncharacteristically brief:

    Note that it’s not “peace” in general but specifically *domestic* peace. There are other things in that point that I haven’t quite teased out — but immediately I’m aware that the founders were focused here on internal matters and not foreign policy, and that’s important to keep in mind.

    Secondly, all of the things we’ve been talking about for the past few days sit under the category of promoting the general welfare — and those are health care, elder care, and the right approaches to employment and the economy.

    Also, with the word “general” added, I begin thinking of Enlightenment questions of The General Will…

    So…some things to think about and talk/write about later, maybe…

  2. Your comment on domestic versus universal peace is right on, and I am editing the post to make that more clear. Thanks for that.

    I agree with your point about general welfare and the things which are covered under that term. It’s something I’ve been exploring more and more lately as the Libertarian agenda is brought more into the limelight with Congressman Paul’s campaign.

    I’m not convinced that economics and a free market are the answers to social ills such as poverty, ill health, and elder care.

    This more than any other is the reason I’m exploring the Constitution in this way.

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