Cognito!

Cognito is our 2005 Ford Escape. We call him that so that when we go somewhere, we can go there “In Cognito”. He’s an AWD V6 XLT with just over 75,000 miles on him. We got him a few weeks ago as a replacement for our 1994 Saab 900s named “Garrincha”: a great car, but we’re feeling more outdoorsy than before.

Speaking of which, we have big plans for Cognito: brush bar, some under-car armor, roof rack, and some better tires. Then, of course, we’ll need rally lights, some stronger suspension, and some welded support for the struts, sway bars, and whatnot. That kind of thing will happen much later, if at all.  Heck, I’m even thinking of installing a snorkel and CB radio!

The end goal? To tote around hiking and fishing gear, explore unknown places, and just generally tool around places we weren’t able to reach with the Saab.

Specifically, I’m looking forward to driving up to and around Vermont in a couple of weeks. There are some gravel pits in my hometown I’m dying to tool around in, and it seems that an old friend of mine is up for the adventure.

I feel like I’m getting old …

See, a week ago I was out in the park with my son and his friends. They’re all 10 and all kinds of energetic and everything. The snow had just melted and I was playing Aerobie with the three of them. A particularly accurate and — if I may say so — brilliant throw from my son sent me running after the neon green flying ring with as much speed as I could muster. It’s not much. However, since my weekend shoes are losing their tread and since the ground was mostly soggy from melting snow, my mustered speed was too much.

I slipped and fell. Flat on my ass. Tailbone. Thud and ouch. It’s hurt ever since.

Why am I writing this to my blog? Because I feel old. My hair is thinning. Falling on my ass hurts for a week. I’m only 34-years old, so I’m not griping. But it does feel like I’m kind of old.

Just sayin’.

The search for podcast software

If your looking for a good solution for recording a podcast — mac or windows — don’t go any further than audacity, an open source tool for recording and editing audio. You can export into mp3 format using the lame encoder. I tried about a million tools over the weekend, and even ended up using a trial of Adobe’s Audition. Nothing recorded better than audacity, though they all had significant more resources devoted to podcasts.

My advice? Use audacity for recording, editing, and saving. Use a sound folder structure on your PC/Mac for keeping track of your files, and keep it simple.