Thoughts on Ferguson

I’ve never seen such a sense of common purpose. Such an outpouring of personal opinion and passionate pleas. If I had known before today what the people I know are capable of, I would have given them more credit than I have on their ability to share a common goal, a common opinion. Unfortunately, that common opinion is ignorant at best, socially harmful and destructive at worst. These people have united in reprimanding those protesting the Grand Jury decision in the shooting death of Michael Brown.

First of all, I want to be perfectly clear about something. I am only able to partially empathize with those in Ferguson who are suffering, because I don’t know their pain directly. I’m a white male living in Northern Vermont. In any demographically sectioned study, I fall into a fairly safe and secure group. That said, however, I can recognize a broken system. We have those up here, too. And it is this system that has failed a large group of citizens, Ferguson being the most recent example.

A successful system is not one that allows a trained police officer to use his gun as a primary mode of defense. Failing a proper training in unarmed self-defense, It is not one that allows that officer to fire five or six lethal shots into an unarmed man when one disabling shot to a shoulder or knee would have done the job. A successful system is not one that assumes a young black man is guilty of anything without probable cause. A successful system does not expect those who are made war against to sit back and calmly take it.

It is obvious to anyone paying attention that our system is broken. The people in Ferguson are reacting in the only way the system has allowed them, by protesting. Rioting. Breaking free of the systemic damage, working outside the system itself, and forcing a change. This is what happens to all systems that fail, and it’s going to get worse if something doesn’t change soon.

If the desire for peace is borne from the same space as a desire for true equality, then the system can be fixed. If, however, the desire for peace is borne from a place that wants to see groups of people take a kick to the face while lying down, the system must be replaced.

Posted in democracy, ire, justice, systems | Leave a comment

Matrices, Patterns, and Consciousness

The overriding joy of pursuing my master’s degree is the forays into matrices, patterns, and consciousness that I’ve been able to take while examining the idea of the lived experience of problem solving. These have been valuable adventures for a number of reasons, not the least of which is the foundation that patterns and consciousness have beneath the way each person lives.

In other words, the patterns of our experiences and our conscious understanding of those patterns allow us the ability to engage with and solve problems. In order for me to understand the process of living with and engaging problems, I need to understand the way consciousness is derived, how it adds to the matrices and patterns of life, and thus how that affects problem solving. There’s the added bonus of both consciousness and patterns being applicable to my work as a User Experience Designer, as well.

At any rate, here are two presentations I’ve given to my seminar on patterns (October, 2013), and consciousness (March, 2014).

Posted in complexity, consciousness, masters, matrices, philosophy | Leave a comment

Victor Densmore’s latest poetry reviewed in Hardwick Gazette

My father’s poetry was reviewed this week in The Hardwick Gazette. Ms. Cook does a great job of capturing what he’s about.

His current book is still available on Amazon (http://amzn.com/1257919350), and we’re working on finding a publisher for his latest group of poems.

dads_review

Posted in family, poetry, vermont | Leave a comment

Response to fuel-efficient super trucks

(Source: February 2014 Truck report)

Energy conservation is a really, really good and absolutely necessary idea. And it’s an idea that Americans need to spend more time getting used to. That being said, it’s not an idea that can be brought about by focusing so heavily on its cost savings. The fact is that conserving energy is a change in lifestyle that will in the short-term raise costs in some cases, and require adjustments to ways of life.

The retrieval, transport, delivery, and consumption of energy is a very large and complex process involving thousands of interactions and touch points. Any change we make in one of these touch points will have an impact on the machinations in another. Adding to the complexity, it is a system that is not closed. That is, it is beholden to influences outside of itself. The diagram above oversimplifies this situation. In reality, the calculation of the depicted numbers involves multiple moving pieces: truck owners, shipping companies, fuel prices, fuel company profits, truck manufacturing profits, engine manufacturing, metals industry, just to name a few of the more obvious ones. Unfortunately, the associate report does not go into detail about how the numbers are derived.

Given the complexity, it is entirely possible that if all long-haul truckers drove these trucks, then profit margins for fuel companies would go down due to the reduction in fuel purchasing frequency. Dropping profit margins are anathema to publicly-traded companies, so fuel prices would likely rise to offset the change in the purchase frequency. Also, any savings would likely take years to materialize given the nature of ownership of these trucks and the initial costs to own them. It is entirely likely that private contractors would not be able to afford the short-term costs and be driven out of business (not dissimilar to smaller fishing concerns in Gloucester, MA have been due to increased restrictions and fuel costs), thus paving the way for larger conglomerate companies who can afford the short-term cost increase.

So yes, we will see a reduction in fuel use and an increase in distance between fill-ups, but at a cost that is perhaps not sustainable in our current system of business ownership and relationships.

A better long-term solution is to drastically alter our reliance on fuel of this kind. To take a look at those things outside this system and see how changes there could have an affect on what we do. Simply using less fuel in a more efficient way will not — in a long-term view — get us where we need to be. At least until our current concepts of business and profit get in the way of true, unadulterated, energy advances.

How about long-haul trucks that are powered by the same kind of solar technology that goes into the pan-Australian race? The fastest car (from the Netherlands) had an average speed of just over 55 MPH. With further research, this can only get better. With better advances in wind power technology, perhaps a solution could be offered that provides on-the-go reserve batter charging for when the sun is down or clouds are above. Perhaps more research into long-distance maglev trains for shipping.

My point is that no matter what solution we propose, there are countless impacts on the existing system that have to be accounted for. A simple poster does not provide an accurate view of what will happen if we enact such things.

This comparison chart from Consumer Reports shows the vast range of differences in cost of ownership across hybrid, standard-, and deisel-fueled models. It’s too long to show here, so I’ll wait. I’m not going anywhere.

As you — hopefully — have seen, the chart shows that the impact of fuel-type on cost is not always positive. There are definitely benefits that owners can realize (financial, environmental, etc.), but it’s disingenuous to say that there will always be a cost benefit. That being the case, I submit that it is just as disingenuous to say the same for owning a hybrid truck.

The argument for hybrid engines — regardless of vehicle type — needs to go beyond cost. There are too many variables to make clear predictions and the historical results are too varied to make a broad statement that it is cost-efficient to own and drive hybrid. Much better arguments are that we are looking to have cleaner air, increase distance between refueling, or use fewer fossil fuels in cars. And if we begin to use these arguments for reasons to own hybrids, it opens up the discussion for other alternative fuels and vehicles such as solar, or mass transit solutions.

Posted in complexity, environment, politics, systems | Leave a comment

And now begins the research

Yesterday my proposal for research was approved by the Johnson State College Institutional Review Board (IRB), and now I begin my foray into the recruiting and research aspects of the process. The end product is some months away, but it feels very very good to be on this road finally.

The process of getting research approved is necessary and harrowing. It’s having your ideas and perceptions of procedure peered at and dissected in ways that either you were unready for or perhaps unwilling to hear. Once the dust settles, though, there is a great deal of pride in knowing that the thesis topic that has plagued you for so many years can finally begin to take shape and direction.

At any rate, it’s a good thing and now on to the recruiting.

The topic of my research is preliminary titled “The puzzles that matter: Qualitative research into the nature of the relationship people have with everyday problems.” It is a phenomenological study into the lived experiences of problem-solving. While there has been much research into the methodology of problem-solving, there has been scant little done on the experience of that methodology. It is our human experience that influences and brings our methodology to bear, so it is our experience that is most cogent in revealing methodological tendencies. It is in this vein that I’m running the study.

The structure of the research is a conversation over the course of 60 – 90 minutes about recurring, everyday problems. The conversation is recorded and then transcribed. All personally identifiable information is removed. Of course, participants can withdraw at any time during or after the interview. All notes and recordings of withdrawn participants are destroyed.

If you’re interested in participating, or know someone who is, please feel free to contact me via Google+, Facebook, or Twitter (links above). Conversely, you can use the call widget on this page to contact me.

Google+

Posted in recruit, research, thesis, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

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